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Paris, 27 August 204

Learning to read : tricking the brain

While reading, children and adults alike must avoid confusing mirror-image letters (like b/d or p/q). Why is it difficult to differentiate these letters? When learning to read, our brain must be able to inhibit the mirror-generalization process, a mechanism that facilitates the recognition of identical objects regardless of their orientation, but also prevents the brain from differentiating letters that are different but symmetrical. A study conducted by the researchers of the Laboratoire de Psychologie du Développement et de l'Education de l'Enfant (CNRS / Université Paris Descartes / Université de Caen Basse-Normandie) is available on the website of the Psychonomic Bulletin & Review (Online First Articles).

To download the press release : Press release_Olivier Houdé

References:

The cost of blocking the mirror-generalization process in reading: Evidence for the role of inhibitory control in discriminating letters with lateral mirror-image counterparts.
Grégoire Borst, Emmanuel Ahr, Margot Roell, and Olivier Houdé
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review (Online First Articles), 23 May 2014. DOI: 10.3758/s13423-014-0663-9

Contact information:

Researcher l Grégoire Borst | T +33 (0)1 40 46 29 95 | gregoire.borst@parisdescartes.fr
Researcher l Olivier Houdé | T +33 (0)1 40 46 29 95 | olivier.houde@parisdescartes.fr
CNRS press officer l Alexiane Agullo l T +33 (0)1 44 96 43 90 l alexiane.agullo@cnrs-dir.fr


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