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Paris, 17 April 2014

Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair

A significant breakthrough could revolutionize surgical practice and regenerative medicine. A team led by Ludwik Leibler from the Laboratoire Matière Molle et Chimie (CNRS/ESPCI Paris Tech) and Didier Letourneur from the Laboratoire Recherche Vasculaire Translationnelle (INSERM/Universités Paris Diderot and Paris 13), has just demonstrated that the principle of adhesion by aqueous solutions of nanoparticles can be used in vivo to repair soft-tissue organs and tissues. This easy-to-use gluing method has been tested on rats. When applied to skin, it closes deep wounds in a few seconds and provides aesthetic, high quality healing. It has also been shown to successfully repair organs that are difficult to suture, such as the liver. Finally, this solution has made it possible to attach a medical device to a beating heart, demonstrating the method's potential for delivering drugs and strengthening tissues. This work has just been published on the website of the journal Angewandte Chemie.

To download the press release: Leibler

Bibliography:

Organ Repair, Hemostasis, and In Vivo Bonding of Medical Devices by Aqueous Solutions of Nanoparticles. Anne Meddahi-Pellé, Aurélie Legrand, Alba Marcellan, Liliane Louedec, Didier Letourneur, Ludwik Leibler. Angewandte Chemie. Published online April 16, 2014. DOI: 10.1002/anie.201401043
View web site

Contacts:

CNRS Researcher l Ludwik Leibler | T +33 (0)1 40 79 51 25 | ludwik.leibler@espci.fr
INSERM Researcher l Didier Letourneur |
T +33 (0)1 40 25 86 00 | didier.letourneur@inserm.fr
CNRS Press Officer l Priscilla Dacher | T +33 (0)1 44 96 46 06 l priscilla.dacher@cnrs-dir.fr


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